When people are focused on proving themselves, they are not focused on improving themselves.

When people are focused on proving themselves, they are not focused on improving themselves.

When we have meaningful connections with others, we will increase their level of engagement with us and with their work.

If you struggle with the discipline required to do the things you need to accomplish the goals you have set for yourself, you are not alone. It takes discipline to be disciplined.

As another year comes to a close, it is a great time to pause and consider where you are in your leadership journey.

“Why should I keep wasting my time providing feedback to the people on my team when they don’t listen? It’s definitely not helping!”

Are you a leader who gives regular feedback to the people on your team? I often ask the people I coach what, if anything, would help them in their job role.

As I write this, we are heading into the holiday season, and then, before you know it, the new year is here. If I have heard one person say it, I have listened to a dozen say, “I can’t believe another year has passed so quickly.” Time is passing; the question you should be asking is, what do you have to show for it?

I once worked for a senior executive that made a point of reminding our team that if the success of our business was entirely dependent on his brain alone, we were in trouble. He regularly used the three most unused words in leadership, "I don't know."

The year was 1628, and the Swedish Warship Vasa was to make her maiden voyage to join the other Swedish warships in the Thirty Years' War. An incredible 64-gun warship, the Vasa was larger than just about anything else found on the waters of Scandinavia in the seventeenth century.